The Sticky Subject of Choosing the Right Glue for Installing Your Engineered Floor

So you’ve decided to install your new engineered floor yourself. You’ve got your kneepads, your saws, pencil, tape measure, a few other accessories and a whole lot of gusto. You’ve decided to go with a glue-down installation. Now the question is, what kind of glue do you use?

After making the complicated choices of choosing the right type of wood, both for looks and structural integrity, then  choosing the appropriate installation method for your floor’s location, glue choice seems like a minor no-brainer. However, there are important things to consider when choosing glue.

First off, are you installing in a location where you have any worries about moisture content? If you have any concerns, it’s best to choose a glue that acts as a vapor barrier as well as an adhesive. It will take a slightly larger chunk out of the pocket book, but it beats having mechanical failures due to moisture down the road. (For those of you skipping over this section, stay tuned for the upcoming post “Board Replacements and You: Why oh Why Didn’t I Just Spring for the Vapor Barrier Glue?”)

Additionally, make sure the glue you’re buying has a guarantee in place. More than this, check to see if the manufacturer of the glue guarantees that their glue will work with the product you are installing. If you’re not installing your floor yourself, check with your installer as well about adhesives. Installers might be prone to stick with adhesives they’ve had luck with in the past, but this might be the time that things don’t jive, and you’ll be the one holding the ball after things go haywire. So be sure and check with the adhesive manufacturer and make sure your installer is on the same page with your findings.

Some other points: Make sure the glue stays on the bottom of the board. Don’t let it creep into the joints, as that will kill your tight fit. Also have solvents on hand for when you get that sticky stuff on yourself. We want you to become attached to your floor, but…

Finally, check your glue for which size/type of trowel it recommends, and also check its dry time, which should both be written on the container. You may have downed a quadruple hazelnut latte prior to getting rolling, but you’re probably not going to cover 3,000 sf in an hour. Although YouTube it if you do, because that would amazing.

Stopping short of diving into the full subject of installation, these are some of the important aspects to remember about glue for your engineered hardwood flooring project. Good luck on your journey into the magical world of adhesives!

Here are a few popular adhesive brands to check out:

Bostik Best (PDF! Not too hefty on the load time, but just FYI it’ll take a second to load.)

BST Urethane (ditto)

Franklin 811 Titebond

2 Replies to “The Sticky Subject of Choosing the Right Glue for Installing Your Engineered Floor”

  1. I am converting my shop to a home….after retirement. It has a concrete floor which has been painted a couple of times. The floor is 42 years old. About 30 years ago, I installed indoor-outdoor carpeting (glued down). I am about to install Engineered Hardwood Flooring. What would you recommend I do to the floor before I start?

    1. It depends on the installation method. If you’re going to float the engineered flooring then all you need to do is make sure it’s level and clean. If your intention is to glue it down, then the paint will need to be removed to ensure proper adhesion. Make sure and check the adhesive manufacturer’s recommendations before proceeding.

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